Behind the Scenes of “Damn Yankees”

ELI WRIGHT

Staff Writer

On May 4th, opening night of the spring musical Damn Yankees,  the curtain will open and the audience will see the hours of hard work that the actors and orchestra have put in. What is less obvious however, is the time put in behind the scenes. The equally important, though less appreciated, work of costumers, set designers, stage managers, spotlight operators, and all other dedicated students who put their talents to use off the stage.

They’re heroes of the show,” said junior Jace Wright on the importance of the crew members. “We really can’t do it without them.”

One incredibly valuable asset to the musical production is the costumes. Each of the performers must be fitted with multiple costumes which are all meticulously chosen and sewn by Marian Azdril and a team of students who put in just as much time as the dancers and singers.

It has it’s ups and downs,” said junior Nadia Vazquez, a student costumer. “But I like making people look good.”

Another crucial aspect are the sets, hand crafted, cut, and painted by students that donated time from their spring breaks to construct the works of art that set the location and time period for the actors.

Spotlight operators walk above the audience all night, controlling spotlights to highlight actors so that the audience knows where to focus for each scene. Stage managers ensure that the actors have every prop, wherever it needs to be, throughout the whole show. In this production of Damn Yankees, this includes everything from a book of crossword puzzles to enough baseball bats for a whole team. And of course, our show would be nothing without the hours of work put in by Director Riley Berris, Vocal Director Carolyn Teroka-Brady, Choreographer Jessica Ballonoff, and Orchestra Director Michael Kiyoi.

The musical plays on May 4th, 5th, 6th, 11th, 12th, and 13th at 7:00 pm. When you attend, please applaud not only the performers that you see on the stage, but give your support to the hard-working individuals whose work goes less noticed.

 

 

 

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